Monday, March 27, 2017

Push for Internet Privacy Rules Moves to Statehouses



Several states are looking to strengthen their internet privacy laws in light of federal rollback of such regulations under the Trump administration. While lobbyists from major tech giants Amazon, Microsoft, and Apple fiercely fight against these privacy measures, both liberal and conservative legislators are joining together to get these bills passed at the state level. With the federal government seemingly siding with large corporations rather than protecting consumers, this situation is reminiscent of when the federal government protected corporations over the rights of workers during the industrial revolution. Personally, I think that internet privacy laws should be a top priority for federal lawmakers. I find the situation to be hopeful despite the strong corporate forces fighting against internet privacy because of the teamwork amongst liberal and conservative politicians at the state level. Do you think internet privacy will be adequately taken care at the state level? What will it take for consumers to push for their rights at the federal level? Who do you think will ultimately win, corporations or consumers?

15 comments:

  1. I too feel as though this push for privacy laws is positive, and has a stronger change for success now that both liberal and conservatives are working together. The states have definitely worked against Washington before, and I hope that they'll be successful this time as well, however I'm hesitant in deciding who will be more successful. Corporations are quite powerful, as their money can help them strengthen their side of the fight. Despite this, I'm still quite hopeful that the states will be able to adequately take care of this privacy issue.

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  2. I agree with Ariana. This push for privacy is positive and beneficial,though temporary, as it has brought two conflicting sides together. Although consumers are many, I believe that corporations have the upper hand in wealth and power. Money is extremely influential and while I hope that the states will pull through and be able to strengthen those laws, I do not think that they'll succeed.

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  3. I like the idea of state governments advocating for internet privacy, but I don't see how they can help. Obviously, the internet is huge, and neither the state governments nor the federal government has control over the majority of those sites. I also think that since this is at the state level, it would be very difficult for tech companies to modify their products for each individual state rather than if the federal government made some regulations.

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  4. I think that it's quite ironic that the article is claiming that the Obama administration was limiting the data private companies could gather about people, when the NSA was gathering way more data, with much less regard for privacy. Just my opinion on the hypocrisy of the government. I also wouldn't support Trump administration's allowing companies to gather more, because I believe people have a right to privacy. However, I personally like the ability of companies to suggest products and info based on what it knows about me. Most of the stuff I post isn't personal anyways, so I think that if the consumer chooses to allow the provider access to some info, this technology could be very beneficial.

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  5. I agree with those who have advocated for the establishment of these internet privacy laws. Seeing as many states have already taken their own measures towards enacting such laws, I believe it is plausible to assume that certain states would serve as models to other states, as the article suggested, and therefore implying that it is adequate form of privacy laws. In terms of consumers making their agenda clear for the federal government in hopes of them taking action, I believe transparency, persistence, and communication between states on a similar basis as to how they form their legislation. For example, I believe Illinois' "right to know" legislation is a form that should definitely be included in any laws that are presented federally, seeing as it simply allows consumers to know where their information is being utilized.

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  6. I think the privacy issue will be better monitored on the state level, just because the federal bureaucracy has lost significant trust from the average American citizen. The issue of privacy is often linked to, as Max mentioned, a hypocrisy among federal branches of government, and I think leaving the states to deal with this issue is more productive overall. As with most issues, it will take a Supreme Court-level case or a massive movement to enact federal involvement, which I don't really see happening. I agree with Hannah in supporting the "right to know" bill; it seems a basic courtesy to know when a corporation or governing body is looking into your personal information.

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  7. I believe that the privacy issue is better to be at the state level. However, there probably won't be able to do much about it. I agree with what Hannah says that it is possible that some states might serve as models for other states. Corporations are very powerful, but at the end I think that the consumers will win because they have the bigger numbers.

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  8. I believe that privacy laws established by he states would be extremely beneficial. This would help protect peoples personal information from a sate level. I think that his should be a states responsibility if the federal government is not taking action. I believe that this will help in the protection of people's private information. I however believe that a person has the right be informed when the government is accessed your personal information. I believe that the line of communication should be both ways.

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  9. I agree with the comments above because when the states take control of privacy, I believe that the regulations would be more enforced than if it were controlled at the federal level.

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  10. I hope, due to bi-partisan support, that bills employed as counter-measures to the new federal bill at the state level are successful in order to protect the consumer. Like with the travel ban, the emergence of states' rights as a powerful force in legislation has been recognized more than ever, and with more support, I believe that the will of the consumers can override something as unconstitutional as this law.

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  11. I agree with the idea that internet privacy would be better controlled at the state level. However, since this would be a state law, there would not be a common law about internet privacy. Therefore, every state would be able to control in a different way which could lead to conflict in the future. In conclusion, I agree that interest privacy should be up to state governments, however, they need to find a way to do so that will limit conflict.

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  12. I think at a state level internet privacy will be better regulated. We need more internet privacy laws and the consumer needs to be better protected by the government. I think action should be taken soon and a bill should be put in place to protect privacy. In the end it's hard to say if the consumers or corporations will win, but with a bill and state level protection, I think it'll be positive for consumers in the future.

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  13. I agree with those who are advocating for state-level internet privacy. In this day and age, too many things are reliant on the internet and technology, and thus a good privacy rule should be established to protect user rights. I cannot say whether the consumers or bigger corporations will win, but if privacy rules are more highly reinforced, then it'll probably benefit the consumers. Like others before me had said and I agree with, if the federal government hasn't taken action that protects privacy, it'd be up to the state, and the state should take action.

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  14. As of now, I don't think that companies collecting data about individuals is too concerning. On many sites, I have seen messages that inform people of the site's "cookie policy," and in any case, are really easy to disable (just use incognito). I think that in the end, the consumers will "win," and companies will need to explicitly get people's permission to collect information about them. In a certain sense, collecting data is just a way for companies to improve their user experience, but I can see why it is seen as a privacy concern.

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  15. While state laws will be greatly influential to the cause of privacy, a federal law about internet privacy would ultimately be necessary because, as we have seen from civil rights and other movements, the federal government has the final say in whether or not these policies will hold. If for some reason the federal government decides to legitimize surveillance over the internet, it would be difficult for states to combat this. However, the unity of the political parties for this cause does give them a huge voice on the matter, so the federal government probably would abstain from any action. That being the case, the decision for internet privacy is left to the states, and I don't believe the corporations would be able to oppose them.

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